September 30, 2015

We just experienced another event that was precipitated by many prophecies of doom and gloom, much like Y2K.  My concern is that when these prophecies did not come to pass, the Blood Moon prophets didn’t apologize. My guess is that they will either spiritualize their bad predictions, or find some event that justifies it. Some are saying NOW that there were no predictions associated with the blood moon. This is interesting for a number of reasons:

  1. Why were the blood moons mentioned if they weren’t supposed to be signs of something significant?
  1. If the “something significant” doesn’t happen during the “blood moon,” then the blood moon must not be a sign. I mean, if it happens a month later, then how did the “blood moon” mark the spot?
  1. The Jewish Feast of Tabernacles happened during an eclipse this year, which is really cool! But there are many other “blood moons” that do not occur on any Jewish feasts or significant events. So what’s the point? I mean, if a star hung over my house only on my birthday then that is one thing. But if it hangs over my house several other times, including my birthday, then that is something different.

Here is the common pattern we have lived with since the book “The Late Great Planet Earth” was published in 1970: People write books that sell thousands of copies (which I have no problem with), and they predict the wildest stuff. But as the dates grow close, they begin to tone down the prophecies and/or change the dates.

When a prophet gives a word, that prophetic word is to be judged by other prophets. If the word is given publicly, then it is publicly judged. This is New Testament protocol. If you give a word and get it wrong (which I have done before), then you are required to take responsibility for your mistake. This isn’t being mean, it is the scriptural way we approach prophecy.

Do you think public prophetic words should be judged?  If so, how? Tell me about it in the comments below.

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